82-year-old villa listed for $1.8 million

If you think a $1.8 million-plus home built in the Roaring Twenties should contain, among other things, a storied past, this landmark property in Santa Ana’s historic Floral Park neighborhood seems to have one.

From Realtor Victoria Biagiotti-Wise on the 3,661-square-foot home on a 18,600-square-foot-lot …

  • The home at 2335 N. Park Blvd. was designed by architect Fay R. Spangler, whose family arrived in this area in 1890 and once owned a blacksmith shop on 3rd Street in Santa Ana. Yes, blacksmith. Fay Spangler also designed the brick office building at 315 W. 3rd St. in what now is Santa Ana’s downtown historic district and later went on to develop other projects throughout California. (By the way, Fay was a man.)
  • The home, completed in 1928, is listed in the California Register of Historical Resources and is eligible for listing in the national register.
  • The house was originally built for Richard A. and Esse Emison. That family was involved in farming, agriculture, sawmills and lumber.
  • There’s some drama: It’s been claimed that the house functioned as an impromptu emergency shelter for the shaken neighborhood during the destructive 1933 Long Beach earthquake.
  • The current owners of the home for the past 45 years, the Georgieff family, has hosted public officials from around the world there, including the president of Macedonia and officials from Bulgaria, Armenia and elsewhere.

Because of the historic status, Biagiotti-Wise says, “Whoever purchases this home could be eligible for the Mills Act –  a big property tax incentive, as well as the Rehabilitation Tax Credit for the preservation of historical structures.”

The Mission/Spanish Colonial Revival style property has 3 separate dwellings, including an apartment and a guest house, with a total of 4 bedrooms and 4.5 baths.

Known as the Emison-Georgieff home, it appears to be the priciest residential listing in Santa Ana right now, at $1,850,000.

Original art pieces from the period include the Spanish, colored-tile entry, wrought-iron spiral staircase and chandelier, original front door and door knobs throughout and several “secret storage compartments,” according to the listing.

There is also a security gate, front courtyard and fountain, a basketball court and a 256-square foot basement — not a common feature these days in a Southern California home.

Read more of this article from the OCRegister.com here.

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